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Project STEP Benefit Concert Featuring Triple Helix at 3 p.m., Sunday, April 2, in Dorchester

Join the talented students of Project STEP and the award-winning musicians of Triple Helix Piano Trio for an extraordinary concert in memory of the life and legacy of Judith Sandler, a long-time friend of Triple Helix. All proceeds from the concert will be put towards the Judith Sandler Fund, a scholarship initiated by Triple Helix for the students of Project STEP.  To order tickets ($15-40) and for more information about the concert and about Project STEP, please click here.  The concert, beginning at 3:00 p.m., will be held at the Parish of All Saints, 209 Ashmont Street, Dorchester, MA 02124 — a short walk from the Ashmont stop on the Red Line.

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Project STEP (String Training Education Program) recognizes that certain racial and ethnic minorities are vastly underrepresented in classical music. Their mission is to address this imbalance by identifying musically talented children from underrepresented Boston communities and providing them with comprehensive music and string instrument instruction. They set the highest standards for their students, provide mentoring and performance opportunities, and create a network of support for the students, their families, and their communities.

Triple Helix to offer second performance of a concert to benefit Communities without Borders

On Sunday, January 29, 2017, at 3 pm, Triple Helix Piano Trio will join the Belmont Festival Orchestra, conducted by Nathaniel Meyer, for a second opportunity to hear an exciting program to benefit Communities without Borders. There are two great works:

Beethoven’s “Triple Concerto” for Violin, Cello, and Piano in C
and Mendelssohn’s “Reformation” Symphony (#5) in D

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This performance will be held at First Unitarian Society in Newton, 1326 Washington Street, West Newton, Mass. 02465.  (The first performance, on Friday, January 27, 2017, at 8 pm, will be held at First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden Street, Cambridge, Mass. 02138.)

Tickets are $30 for adults and $15 for students. To order tickets, click here.

For more information about Communities without Borders and about the performers, click here.

The Mission of Communities Without Borders is to enable a better future for orphans and vulnerable children in Zambia through access to education and related care. Collaborating with community organizations and individuals, we build enduring personal relationships that foster mutual understanding and inspire a shared sense of responsibility as world citizens. CWB’s model pairs needy communities in Zambia with more affluent communities in the US in order to build trust and friendship between the two communities and increase opportunities for the Zambian children. To make a donation, please click here

Please come to hear great music and to support a great cause!

Triple Helix to perform Beethoven’s Triple Concerto to benefit Communities without Borders

On Friday, January 27, 2017, at 8 pm, Triple Helix Piano Trio will join the Belmont Festival Orchestra, conducted by Nathaniel Meyer, for an exciting program to benefit Communities without Borders. There are two great works:

Beethoven’s “Triple Concerto” for Violin, Cello, and Piano in C
and Mendelssohn’s “Reformation” Symphony (#5) in D

CommunitiesBordersTripleHelix1

This performance will be held at First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden Street, Cambridge, Mass. 02138.

There will be a second performance of these works on Sunday, January 29, 2017, at 3 pm, at First Unitarian Society in Newton, 1326 Washington Street, West Newton, Mass. 02465.

Tickets are $30 for adults and $15 for students. To order tickets, click here.

For more information about Communities without Borders and about the performers, click here.

The Mission of Communities Without Borders is to enable a better future for orphans and vulnerable children in Zambia through access to education and related care. Collaborating with community organizations and individuals, we build enduring personal relationships that foster mutual understanding and inspire a shared sense of responsibility as world citizens. CWB’s model pairs needy communities in Zambia with more affluent communities in the US in order to build trust and friendship between the two communities and increase opportunities for the Zambian children. To make a donation, please click here

Please come to hear great music and to support a great cause!

Trios for Clarinet, Cello, and Piano to be performed by William Hudgins, Ronald Lowry, and Lois Shapiro, at 3 pm, Sunday, January 15, in Needham

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The Needham Concert Society is kicking off its 2017 Season with a program of trios by Beethoven, Fauré and Brahms.  William Hudgins, Pricipal Clarinetist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, will be joined by Ronald Lowry, cello and Lois Shapiro, piano.  The performance will be held at 3 pm, Sunday, January 15, at the First Baptist Church of Needham, 858 Great Plain Avenue, Needham.  Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for seniors.  Students are admitted free.  Tickets are available at the door or ticket info at http://www.needhamconcertsociety.org.

Join Triple Helix April 10 for a Project STEP Benefit Concert!

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Project STEP will join forces once again with the Triple Helix Piano Trio to present the second annual joint benefit concert in honor of the life and legacy of Judith Sandler, a longtime friend of the piano trio. All proceeds from the concert will be put towards the Judith Sandler Fund, a new scholarship initiated by Triple Helix for the students of Project STEP. This year, Project STEP and Triple Helix will be joined by some very special guests: members of the conductorless chamber orchestra, A Far Cry! The concert will include works by Piazzolla and Schubert, and will feature collaborations among all three ensembles.

The concert will be held on Sunday, April 10th, 2016, at 3 pm, at the First Unitarian Society in Newton, 1326 Washington Street (corner of Highland Street in West Newton Square).

Tickets are from $16.82 to $43.19. For more information and to purchase your tickets today on Eventbrite, click here. Or you may buy them at the door. Also, please help us spread the word by joining our event on our Facebook page (click here), and sharing it with your friends!

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Lois Shapiro and the Omer Quartet this Sunday, March 6, at 3 pm, at Rivers School Conservatory

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This Sunday, come hear Janácek and Dvorák performed by Lois Shapiro and The Omer Quartet, Grand Prize winners of the 2013 Fischoff Chamber Music Competition!  The concert will run from 3:00 to 4:30 pm, and comprise the following works:

• Leos Janácek’s piano suite, On an Overgrown Path (1900-1911)
• Janácek’s String Quartet #1, “Kreutzer Sonata” (1923)
• Antonin Dvorák’s Quintet in A for Piano and Strings, Op. 81 (1887)

At 2:00, one hour before the concert, Lois will give a lecture-demonstration on these works:

“The Collective Dream Lights the Pathway Home”

“We need to go back to that rare and inexhaustible school, the life of the people, to regenerate and purify ourselves….He who grows from folk song, grows into a whole man. If our art music can grow out of this folk source, all of us will embrace each other in these products of art music. It will unite us…Folk song can bind all of mankind into one spirit, one kind of happiness, one kind of bliss.”
Leos Janacek 1926

Growing up in what is now the Czech Republic–a country with a long and painful history of outside domination and cultural suppression– Dvorák and Janácek turned with special fervor and urgency to their folk music tradition for sustenance on several levels. Their music was a kind of “message in a bottle”: the musical essence of their people, set adrift in the larger world. Also, at a time that classical music was itself in a crisis of coherence, their musical “mother tongue” became a powerful, organizing principle for these composers:  The collective dream of their folk tradition did indeed light the pathway to their own unique musical voices.

The performance will be held in Rivera Recital Hall, Rivers School Conservatory, 333 Winter Street, Weston, MA 02493.  It’s free, but tickets should be reserved in advance.  Click here to go to the web page for this event and scroll down to where you can make your reservation.

East Meets West at Triple Helix’s concert at Rivers School Conservatory, 3 pm, Sunday, January 31

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Triple Helix returns to Rivers School Conservatory on Sunday, January 31, to perform the following works:

• Bright Sheng: Four Movements for Piano Trio
• Arno Babadjanian: Piano Trio
• Johannes Brahms: Piano Trio in Bb, Op. 8

This performance, held in Rivera Hall, will begin at 3 pm, with a pre-concert lecture at 2 pm.  The concert is free and open to the public.   Rivera Hall is located at 333 Winter St, Weston, MA 02493.

The Vocal Impulse: East and West 

                  World famous golden-thighed Pythagoras
                  Fingered upon a fiddle-stick or strings
                  What a star sang and careless Muses heard.
In “Among School Children,”  William Butler Yeats expresses a notion shared by many poets throughout the ages: the primal creative impulse was a vocal one.  Some composers, whether writing for voice or instruments, manifest as well an essentially lyrical impulse in their work.  Such a predilection shows itself in certain characteristics, regardless of the particular musical style: the rhythm, compass, flow and shape of the lines endow them with a natural “singability.”  Even more important, by virtue of some ineffable alchemy, music conceived lyrically possesses the eloquent fragility of a direct, individual human utterance, unmediated by mechanistic considerations.  Instrumental virtuosity serves a lyrical premise.  The landscape is one of human scale, and grandiosity is eschewed.
This afternoon’s program features music which derives from such a vocal impulse.  Bright Sheng, drawing on the rich folkmusic heritage of his native China, transforms a Western piano trio into an exotic palette of aural colors, and conjures the diaphanous yet also savage world of Chinese song.  Rooted in an aesthetic that considers melodious music as an ideal conduit between man’s sound nature and the universal sound order — and therefore as a way to reach higher states of consciousness — music is deeply valued within traditional Chinese culture for its capacity to instill an inner tranquility that fosters virtuousness.  In this context, it is no great surprise that the Chinese ideograph for “music” also means “happiness”!  The mystical, meditative, spare melodic writing, particularly in movements 1 and 4 of the Sheng, does indeed give us a taste of the music’s capacity to convey unalloyed spiritual essence.
Arno Babadjanian, an Armenian composer, distilled the essence of his indigenous musical tradition — in terms of its exotically-flavored scale formations, rich, harmonic colors, and assymmetrical dance rhythms — to create an intensely dramatic and poignant lyricism in his rarely-heard piano trio.
Brahms’s Op. 8 Trio epitomizes his penchant for long-lined lyricism wedded to a grand but terse symphonic structure.  A buoyant elan, a sense of organic unfolding, and rhythmic innovation — freeing the music from the fetters of squareness — characterize Brahms’s melodic writing, the seeming naturalness of which belies his perfectionistic tendencies.